Bug Out Bag Essentials: 7 Items For Every Day Carry

Assembling a survival pack, or bug out bag, for emergencies is essential in today’s society.  You never know when a national emergency might happen.

That emergency might look life a weather event, a terrorist attack, or some other form of natural disaster.

For most of us, however, it is not practical to go about our daily lives with a bug out bag filled with essentials strapped to our back (though I do like the idea of stashing one at the office and/or in the car).

I also like the idea of keeping some essential survival tools on us as part of our every day carry (EDC) toolkit.

Bug Out Bag List

1.  Lighter.  It only occurred to me just recently to begin carrying a lighter every day.  No, I don’t smoke, but in terms of fire-starting ability it doesn’t get much easier than the flick of a Bic.  What bug out bag list is complete with a fire starter?

2.  Knife and or multi-tool.  A Swiss army knife or good multi-tool can provide a variety of practical tools in a small package.  I carry both; a Kershaw folding knife in one pocket and a small multi-tool as part of my bug out bag essentials.

3.  Flashlight.  Bright flashlights can actually double as a weapon.  I often carry a Surefire Defender tactical flashlight on me when I anticipate being out after dark, or in a dark area (movie theater, etc).

It was expensive, but having 500 lumens at the ready makes me feel safer.  As a bonus, it’s perfectly legal to carry.

4.  Cash.  In this plastic age many people overlook the need to carry a little cash, or as my grandfather used to call it, “walking around money.”  Make it a point to always keep a couple hundred dollars on your person – not so much that you worry about getting mugged, but enough to cover any small emergency.

5.  Protection.  If your local laws allow the conceal carry of a firearm, I recommend it.  However, if carrying a firearm is not practical in your situation, consider these alternatives to guns for personal protection.

6.  Water filtration.  A water filtration device such as the LifeStraw is a relatively easy way to make potable water in a crunch.

7.  Pocket survival kit.  This last one is something I made from a used Altoids tin.  I lined the bottom edges with black electrical tape to make it harder to open (and somewhat water resistant).

Inside I placed a mini Bic lighter, a couple band-aids, cotton swabs (kindling), safety pins, $20 in assorted bills, a mini LED light and a Benadryl tablet in its blister pack.

Here is a good post on Altoid survival tins for some inspiration.  I’ll share some pics of my own on Altoid survival tin on the Debt Reckoning Facebook page.

What’s on your bug out bag list?

 

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